Posts by Leila Latif

The enduring legacy of Ousmane Sembène

By Leila Latif

A new restoration of his long out-of-print 1968 film Mandabi offers cause to celebrate the late Senegalese maverick.

After Love

By Leila Latif

Joanna Scanlan’s Islamic convert goes on a literal and metaphorical journey following the death of her husband.

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Violation

By Leila Latif

Dusty Mancinelli and Madeleine Sims-Fewer’s gruelling rape revenge thriller shrewdly subverts the genre.

review

LaKeith Stanfield: ‘There’s a big fear about people of colour being in power’

By Leila Latif

The actor discusses the ambiguity of his role in Judas and the Black Messiah while espousing peace, love and connectivity.

The Scary of Sixty-First – first-look review

By Leila Latif

A woman becomes possessed by the spirit of one of Jeffrey Epstein’s victims in this misguided psychological horror.

Tina – first-look review

By Leila Latif

Tina Turner has the final say on her tumultuous life and glittering career in this all-access documentary.

Verdict

By Leila Latif

This sensitive and harrowing portrait of domestic abuse looks at how the justice system fails women.

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Judas and the Black Messiah

By Leila Latif

Commanding performances from LaKeith Stanfield and Daniel Kaluuya power this electrifying Black Panther drama.

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Life in a Day 2020

By Leila Latif

Kevin Macdonald updates his crowdsourced 2010 documentary to give a glimpse of life on Earth in the age of Covid.

review

Passing – first-look review

By Leila Latif

Ruth Negga and Tessa Thompson star in this slow-paced but perceptive race drama from Rebecca Hall.

Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised) – first-look review

By Leila Latif

Questlove’s triumphant directorial debut charts the cultural impact and legacy of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival.

Il Mio Corpo

By Leila Latif

Michele Pennetta trains his camera on a young Nigerian migrant living in Sicily in this poetic docudrama.

review

Watch this powerful new film about white guilt and Black womanhood

By Leila Latif

Somalia Seaton’s A Response to Your Message is a personal reflection on this year’s Black Lives Matter protests.

I’m Your Woman

By Leila Latif

Rachel Brosnahan sheds her Mrs Maisel shtick in this compelling road movie about a woman on the run.

review

Brandon Cronenberg: ‘We built a wax Andrea Riseborough’

By Leila Latif

The genre prodigy talks perfect casting and practical effects in his latest shocker, Possessor.

Possessor

By Leila Latif

Brandon Cronenberg follows up his impressive debut Antiviral with a visceral slice of hallucinatory ultraviolence.

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Love Child

By Leila Latif

Eva Mulvad’s moving docudrama sees an Iranian couple flee their home to follow their hearts.

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Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer is a terrifying look at the banality of evil

By Leila Latif

John McNaughton’s infamous 1986 horror possesses a raw nihilistic power and uncompromising brutality.

The Painter and the Thief

By Leila Latif

A Czech artist develops an unlikely bond with the man who stole her work in this compassionate documentary.

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The Witches

By Leila Latif

Roald Dahl’s timeless children’s story is reimagined as a saccharine caper – but at least the cast are having fun.

review

Raise Hell: The Life and Times of Molly Ivins

By Leila Latif

A roistering doc profile of the late, liberal tub-thumper who worked at The New York Times.

review

One Man and His Shoes

By Leila Latif

This intriguing documentary explores the intersection between African American culture and basketball sneakers.

review

Cordelia

By Leila Latif

Sporadically absorbing psychodrama in which a traumatised woman has a fling with her mysterious neighbour.

review

After Love – first-look review

By Leila Latif

Joanna Scanlan plays a Muslim convert who discovers a secret about her husband in Aleem Khan’s moving drama.

African Apocalypse and the painful legacy of ‘Heart of Darkness’

By Leila Latif

A new documentary gives a voice to the silenced natives in Joseph Conrad’s colonialist novel.

Body of Water

By Leila Latif

Lucy Brydon’s bold debut charts a woman’s struggle to rebuild her life while in recovery from an eating disorder.

review

Riz Ahmed and Bassam Tariq on the personal journey of Mogul Mowgli

By Leila Latif

The actor and director discuss the shared experiences that inspired their bittersweet love letter to their spiritual home.

I Am Woman

By Leila Latif

Pop music and women’s liberation come to the fore in director Unjoo Moon’s slight biopic of Helen Reddy.

review

Mulan

By Leila Latif

Disney’s live action remake ditches the kitsch and catchy songs – and is arguably weaker for it.

review

Da 5 Bloods

By Leila Latif

Spike Lee tackles black trauma, white saviourism and the ingloriousness of war in this searing Vietnam epic.

review LWLies Recommends

A take-down of movies about nice guys who pester women

By Leila Latif

Exploring the rich and disturbing cinematic history of benign stalking. Whoever said nice guys finish last?

Jordan Peele’s The Twilight Zone is a worthy successor to Rod Serling’s original

By Leila Latif

The Get Out and Us director has delivered a fresh set of sci-fi nightmares.

Mommie Dearest: The changing face of maternal horror cinema

By Leila Latif

A Quiet Place and Hereditary are the latest films to challenge idealised notions of motherhood.

The complex cinematic legacy of Martin Luther King Jr

By Leila Latif

Fifty years after his death, does the Civil Rights Leader’s on screen image belie his true nature?

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Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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