Berlin Film Festival

This year’s Berlinale Forum grappled with humanity’s fraught place in the world

By Patrick Gamble

Emerging from the pandemic, filmmakers experimented with form and narrative to pose deeper questions about our past, present and future.

Dreaming Walls – first-look review

By Greg Wetherall

Maya Duverdier and Amelie Van Elmbt investigate the legacy and current precarious state of one of New York’s most enduring cultural landmarks.

The Quiet Girl – first-look review

By Alicia Haddick

A young girl discovers a life she never thought possible in the Irish countryside in Colm Bairéad’s affecting debut feature.

The Novelist’s Film – first-look review

By Matt Turner

Hong Sang-soo interrogates the function of art in his seemingly self-reflective latest feature.

Against the Ice – first-look review

By Lou Thomas

Peter Finth’s chilly Arctic drama features some stunning scenery but ultimately proves an underwhelming watch.

Bubble – first-look review

By Alicia Haddick

Despite boasting an interesting concept, anime giant Tetsuro Araki’s first original feature plays it a little too safe.

Alcarràs – first-look review

By Caitlin Quinlan

Carla Simón’s semi-autobiographical second feature is a charming affair, focusing on a family whose farmland is under threat.

A Piece of Sky – first-look review

By Alicia Haddick

Michael Koch’s drama about an Alpine couple whose lives are changed by a devastating medical diagnosis proves a frustrating watch.

Everything Will Be OK – first-look review

By Matt Turner

Cambodian filmmaker Rithy Panh ponders a world where animals have enslaved the human race in his latest experimental feature.

The Outfit – first-look review

By Lou Thomas

Screenwriter Graham Moore turns his hand to directing with this sartorial spy thriller starring Mark Rylance.

Shall I Compare You to a Summer’s Day – first-look review

By Alicia Haddick

Poetry and performance take centre stage in Mohammad Shawky Hassan's inventive challenge to society's heteronormativity.

The United States of America – first-look review

By Patrick Gamble

A documentary master presents an updated portrait of the USA, drawing on his previous version first released in 1975.

Heart of Oak – first-look review

By Greg Wetherall

Laurent Charbonnier and Michel Seydoux spend a year with a magnificent oak tree in this meditation on nature.

The Passengers of the Night – first-look review

By David Jenkins

This aimless and thin family portrait set in ’80s Paris is boosted by an affecting turn from Charlotte Gainsbourg.

Both Sides of the Blade – first-look review

By Hannah Strong

Juliette Binoche and Vincent Lindon play a couple whose relationship is tested by the arrival of an old friend in Claire Denis’ latest.

Flux Gourmet – first-look review

By Hannah Strong

Peter Strickland serves up a helping of culinary chaos in his suitably strange fifth feature film.

Nobody’s Hero – first-look review

By David Jenkins

The latest from French filmmaker Alain Guiraudie is an eccentric urban farce combining true love and terrorism.

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Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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