Reviews

Jumanji: The Next Level

By Hannah Woodhead

The gang gets a sequel... Danny DeVito and Awkwafina join the cast of this glossy fantasy adventure.

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Pink Wall

By Max Copeman

Actor-turned-director Tom Cullen’s feature debut episodically pieces together a relationship falling apart.

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Citizen K

By Ed Gibbs

Documentary maker Alex Gibney surveys post-Soviet Russia via the strange tale of Mikhail Khodorkovsky.

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System Crasher

By Millicent Thomas

Nora Fingscheidt’s narrative debut follows a wild child who’s been failed by Germany’s foster system.

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Lucy in the Sky

By Hannah Woodhead

Astronaut Natalie Portman struggles to adapt to life back on earth in Noah Hawley’s dull space drama.

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The Cave

By Matt Turner

Syrian filmmaker Feras Fayyad provides another wrenching portrait of the people most afflicted by the civil war.

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Honey Boy

By Hannah Woodhead

Shia LaBeouf plays his own father in this dramatised account of his own troubled childhood.

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So Long, My Son

By Josh Slater-Williams

Wang Xiaoshuai’s domestic drama charts a generation of political and social upheaval in his native China.

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Motherless Brooklyn

By Adam Woodward

Edward Norton directs and stars in this patchwork New York noir about a Tourette-suffering private eye.

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The Street

By Maria Nae

Photographer Zed Nelson documents the changes to one street in East London over a four-year period.

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Shooting the Mafia

By David Jenkins

Kim Longinotto’s latest documentary offers a stark, deromanticised look at the Sicilian Mafia.

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Knives Out

By David Jenkins

Rian Johnson does his best Agatha Christie impression in this riotous, star-packed homage to the classic whodunnit.

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Atlantics

By David Jenkins

Mati Diop announces herself as a major new talent with this Gothic-tinged romantic mystery.

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The Nightingale

By Elena Lazic

Jennifer Kent follows up The Babadook with a gruelling yet vital portrait of colonialism in 19th century Tasmania.

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Little Women

By David Jenkins

Greta Gerwig delivers one of the great modern literary adaptations with her second feature as writer/director.

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Promare

By Kambole Campbell

Pyrokinetic mutants, shirtless firefighters and eco-fascists collide in the first feature film from Studio Trigger.

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The Two Popes

By Charles Bramesco

Anthony Hopkins and Jonathan Pryce give an acting masterclass in Fernando Meirelles’ Papal tête-à-tête.

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Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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