In Praise Of

RIP Terry Jones – In praise of Mr Creosote and The Meaning of Life

By David Jenkins

An ode to perhaps the greatest gross-out set-piece ever committed to film.

Why I love Carole Lombard’s performance in No Man of Her Own

By Lauren Pinnington

Alongside her future partner, Clark Gable, this 1932 romantic comedy established Lombard as a bona fide movie star.

How His Girl Friday redefined the screwball comedy

By Adam Scovell

Howard Hawks’ 1940 film remains one of Hollywood’s finest and most radical comedies.

How Marcel Camus’ Black Orpheus brought bossa nova to the world

By Lara C Cory

This musical retelling of the Orpheus and Eurydice myth helped to popularise the Brazilian sound.

The enduring legacy of Anna Karina’s on-screen style

By Sophie Wilson

The late icon’s playful dress sense brought a breath of fresh air to the films of the French New Wave.

Why I love Meryl Streep’s performance in Kramer vs Kramer

By Beth Piket

Her affecting turn as woman in turmoil Joanna earned her the first of many Oscar wins.

Is Hans Gruber the ultimate cinematic embodiment of capitalism?

By Sam Moore

Alan Rickman’s iconic Die Hard baddie is a faux-revolutionary motivated purely by financial gain.

Milk bars, jazz and showgirls: The intoxicating world of Expresso Bongo

By Anna Cale

Sixty years on, Val Guest’s delightfully murky musical satire retains a defiantly British sensibility.

Why I love Eva Marie Saint’s performance in On the Waterfront

By Adam Scovell

For all of its seething male energy, it’s the film’s young female lead who emerges as its star performer.

How Gillian Armstrong feminised Australian Cinema

By Laura Venning

In 1979, the first Australian film directed by a woman since the silent era signalled a new dawn for female authorship.

In this age of ecological crisis, Nausicaä’s message is more vital than ever

By Serena Scateni

The radical ethics of Hayao Miyazaki’s fearless heroine still resonates today.

Forty years on, does Heaven’s Gate deserve its reputation?

By Christopher Karr

From unqualified disaster to visionary epic, critical opinion on Michael Cimino’s 1980 western has shifted over the years.

In defence of the Rise of the Footsoldier franchise

By Paul Ridd

The low-rent British gangster series has a lot more to offer than brainless, brutal violence.

An Unmarried Woman and the power of female agency

By Nicole Davis

Paul Mazursky’s 1978 divorce drama contains one of cinema’s most authentic portrayals of womanhood.

In praise of Natalie Portman’s women in power

By Emily Gett

From Senator Padmé to Jacqueline Kennedy, the actor has always relished playing complex, self-empowered characters.

How Sarah Connor kept the Terminator franchise running

By Amanda Keats

Linda Hamilton’s return in Dark Fate reminds us why her complex heroine is so vital to the series.

Is this the clearest insight into Martin Scorsese’s moral perspective?

By Jake Cole

Released in 1999, Bringing Out the Dead is a clear response to the perceived ambiguity of Taxi Driver.

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About Little White Lies

Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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