Truth and Movies

In Praise Of

Why I love Jean Harlow’s performance in Wife vs Secretary

By Lauren Pinnington

Her easy charm and chemistry with Clark Gable elevates this otherwise unremarkable workplace rom-com.

How Tod Browning’s Dracula changed horror cinema forever

By Adam Scovell

The 1931 film put the Count firmly on the cultural map and moved the genre on from its silent origins.

Trust No One: The lingering paranoia of The Parallax View

By Saffron Maeve

Alan J Pakula’s prescient 1974 political thriller sees Warren Beatty infiltrate a shady organisation.

How Derek Jarman’s films queer the narrative of history

By Sam Moore

In 1976’s Sebastiane and 1986’s Caravaggio, the director refuses to relegate homosexuality to the subtext.

Me Without You and the toxic female friendship

By Lydia Figes

Sandra Goldbacher’s coming-of-age drama from 2001 powerfully portrays the perils of female intimacy.

Eyes Wide Shut is an anti-consumerist holiday classic

By Brianna Zigler

Stanley Kubrick’s final film contains a thinly-veiled critique of the vulgar excess and materialism of Christmas.

An auteur and his flying machine: Brewster McCloud at 50

By Saffron Maeve

Robert Altman’s long-overlooked satire reflects the director’s frustrations with the Hollywood studio system.

The other side of Marlene Dietrich

By Pamela Hutchinson

A new season at BFI Southbank celebrates the career of this screen icon, including many of her lesser-known works.

Looking into the heart of Miller’s Crossing

By David Jenkins

The Coen brothers’ classic gangland neo-noir remains one of their most potent and illusive works.

How GoldenEye reinvigorated the James Bond franchise

By Mark Allison

With a new 007 and more progressive sexual politics, this film brought the series up to speed with the modern world.

Silent Running remains a tender riposte to Stanley Kubrick’s 2001

By Brian Quinn

Directed by SFX visionary Douglas Trumbull, this homespun space odyssey is a far more soulful affair.

Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer is a terrifying look at the banality of evil

By Leila Latif

John McNaughton’s infamous 1986 horror possesses a raw nihilistic power and uncompromising brutality.

Transgressive femininity in Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca

By Eleanor Ring

The 1940 adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s novel sees the title character refuse to be tamed by marriage.

The sobering prescience of Kathryn Bigelow’s Strange Days

By Thomas Hobbs

The director’s 1995 tech noir isn’t her most critically or commercially successful film, but it might just be her most important.

Yield to the Night remains a powerful rallying cry for social change

By Anna Cale

This powerful Diana Dors prison drama from 1956 makes a compelling case against capital punishment.

Why Outrage remains a vital film for survivors of sexual violence

By Lizzy Dening

Ida Lupino’s 1950 drama about a young woman who is raped on her way home from work feels as urgent as ever.

10 years on, The Social Network is sharper than ever

By Luke Walpole

David Fincher and Aaron Sorkin’s inside look at the creation of Facebook has got better – and more prescient – with age.

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About Little White Lies

Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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