Truth and Movies

In Praise Of

Why Outrage remains a vital film for survivors of sexual violence

By Lizzy Dening

Ida Lupino’s 1950 drama about a young woman who is raped on her way home from work feels as urgent as ever.

10 years on, The Social Network is sharper than ever

By Luke Walpole

David Fincher and Aaron Sorkin’s inside look at the creation of Facebook has got better – and more prescient – with age.

How Takeshi Kitano went from comedian to crime auteur

By James Balmont

With his yakuza thriller Boiling Point, “Beat” Takeshi staked his claim as a serious filmmaker.

In praise of Robert Redford’s Ordinary People

By Rafaela Sales Ross

Redford’s directorial debut holds its ground as one of cinema’s most moving explorations of loss and guilt.

Why David Fincher’s Se7en is the perfect odd couple movie

By Lorna Codrai

As detectives Mills and Somerset, Brad Pitt and Morgan Freeman make for a dynamic, contradictory pairing.

Blood, Hair and Pain: Ginger Snaps at 20

By Anna Bogutskaya

The director, screenwriter and stars of the cult Canadian horror reflect on its legacy as a morbid love letter to teenage girls everywhere.

10 years on, Denis Villeneuve’s Incendies still haunts me

By Lucas Oakeley

This searing drama forced me to confront the uncomfortable reality of my relatively privileged upbringing in the Middle East.

Why I love Alain Delon’s performance in Rocco and his Brothers

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

The French screen idol is at his most open and vulnerable in Luchino Visconti’s 1960 crime drama.

The search for truth in Christopher Nolan’s Memento

By Daniel Broadley

Guy Pearce’s amnesia-suffering, tattoo-covered protagonist is cinema’s ultimate unreliable narrator.

Why I love Gene Hackman’s performance in The Conversation

By Alexander Boucher

His role as taciturn surveillance expert Harry Caul is a masterful portrayal of alienation and loneliness.

She Dies Tomorrow is the defining film of the doomer generation

By Annika Morling

Amy Seimetz’s apocalyptic horror speaks to the growing pessimism about the future among young people.

How V-Cinema sparked a Japanese filmmaking revolution

By James Balmont

The ’90s straight-to-video boom reinvigorated the industry and made stars of directors like Takashi Miike.

Black female empowerment in Bring It On

By Ayoola Solarin

The cheerleading comedy has aged better than most early-2000s teen movies, especially in how it tackles systematic inequality and cultural appropriation.

Wild at Heart remains an empowering depiction of female trauma

By Lillian Crawford

In David Lynch’s 1990 film, Laura Dern’s Lula refuses to allow her rape to control her – she’s a survivor, not a victim.

Why Sunset Boulevard remains a glorious Gothic horror

By Sam Moore

Billy Wilder’s classic Hollywood satire from 1950 is also a great post-modern ghost story.

Why I love Dakota Johnson’s performance in Suspiria

By McKinzie Smith

Her deft turn as dancer Susie Bannion resonates with me and many other women attempting to come into our own.

“There were times when I was sore from laughing” – Adam McKay on The Other Guys at 10

By Simon Bland

The director reflects on the making of his 2010 buddy cop comedy, and the serious message at its heart.

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About Little White Lies

Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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