In Praise Of

The fractured masculinities of Alfonso Cuarón

By Megan Wallace

The Mexican director’s early Spanish-language films offer vital dissections of the male ego.

In praise of Antichrist – Lars von Trier’s anti-misogynist masterpiece

By Amy Simmons

The Danish filmmaker’s visceral battle of the sexes is one of his most misunderstood – and best – works.

Why Scrooged remains the ultimate anti-Christmas film

By Chris Heasman

Thirty years ago, Bill Murray’s cruel network executive taught us all the importance of spreading a little seasonal misery.

Tears of a Wookiee – The Star Wars Holiday Special at 40

By Beth Webb

Show writer Bruce Vilanch reflects on the strange legacy of this psychedelic seasonal folly.

Why I love Jean Seberg’s performance in Breathless

By Adam Scovell

The American star led something of a tragic life, but she will forever be remembered for her role in Jean-Luc Godard’s debut feature.

The strange, surprising legacy of Jacob’s Ladder

By Steve Timms

The influence of Adrian Lyne’s 1990 psychological horror, starring Tim Robbins and Elizabeth Peña, far outstretches its modest success.

The Polish-American immigrant who changed the face of animation

By Georgina Guthrie

Max Fleischer, creator of Betty Boop and the rotoscope, was one of the great cartoonists of the 20th century.

John Carpenter’s The Fog is even more chilling if you live by the sea

By Thomas Hobbs

A personal essay on the director’s 1980 horror, which returns to cinemas this Halloween.

It’s Showtime! – Why Beetlejuice remains the ghost with the most

By Justine Smith

Thirty years ago, Tim Burton unleashed his colourful, bizarre vision of the afterlife onto the world.

In praise of Velvet Goldmine – Todd Haynes’ gaudy love letter to glam rock

By Robb Sheppard

The director’s third feature from 1998 is a glitter-covered ode to the 1970s.

In praise of Orphée – Jean Cocteau’s mould-breaking masterpiece

By Felix Bazalgette

The French filmmaker’s haunting 1950 work fluidly blurs the line between technology and magic.

How Twelve Monkeys built on the legacy of La Jetée and Vertigo

By Adam Scovell

Themes of memory and death lie at the heart of Terry Gilliam’s dystopian time travel saga.

How Halloween stoked our fears and misunderstanding of mental illness

By Frazer Macdonald

In Michael Myers, director John Carpenter created an enduring yet harmful horror archetype.

Why I love Chloe Sevigny’s performance in Boys Don’t Cry

By Romy Somerset

Her Oscar-nominated supporting turn is a glimmer of light in an otherwise devastating film.

The enduring legacy of Gilda Radner

By Rebecca Nicole Williams

With Love, Gilda, the late comedian and first breakout star of SNL finally gets the documentary she deserves.

The Fallen Idol is one of the great films about the loss of childhood innocence

By Adam Scovell

Carol Reed’s 1948 classic captures the transition to adulthood in all its contradictions and hypocrisies.

Cheap Thrills: In Praise of The Evil Dead

By Anton Bitel

On the envelope-pushing effects work of Sam Raimi’s hand-tooled gorefest, set for re-release this Halloween.

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About Little White Lies

Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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