War

Land of Mine

By Mark Allison

A group of German POWs are forced to dig up land mines in Martin Zandvliet’s war drama.

review

The Wall

By Courteney Tan

Doug Liman returns with a war-based theatrical three-hander about an injured US soldier being tormented by an Iraqi sharpshooter.

review

Dunkirk

By Adam Woodward

Christopher Nolan’s breathtaking historical opus attempts to give the viewer a taste of what war actually feels like.

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A Good Day to Die, Hoka Hey

By Juliette Cottu

This decent documentary captures the thrills and dangers of front-line war photography.

review

War Machine

By William Carroll

David Michôd and Brad Pitt serve up a fascinating but uneven satire of America’s military might.

review

Frantz

By Amy Bowker

A dour monochrome melodrama is the latest from genre-hopping French workhorse, François Ozon.

review

Man Down

By Jack Godwin

A fired-up Shia LaBeouf tries and fails to salvage this muddled war drama.

review

Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk

By Adam Nayman

Ang Lee takes American exceptionalism to task in this hyper-real spectacle.

review

Hacksaw Ridge

By David Jenkins

Mel Gibson delivers an intensely brutal war movie with an intriguing moral twist.

review LWLies Recommends

Tiger Raid

By Poppy Doran

Simon Dixon’s mercenary drama is liberal with the bullets but fails to hit gory glory.

review

Free State of Jones

By Adam Woodward

Matthew McConaughey suffers from white saviour complex in this deeply problematic Civil War drama.

review

Anthropoid

By Lauren Thompson

Stick with this World War Two-set assassination thriller – a dull start gives way to a heart-racing climax.

review

Men Go to Battle

By Matthew Eng

Zachary Treitz’s lo-fi Civil War comedy offers an admirable, inventive take on a stodgy subgenre.

review

Ivan’s Childhood (1962)

By David Jenkins

The startling, bleakly poetic debut feature from one of the movie pantheon greats, Andrei Tarkovsky.

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Eye in the Sky

By Clarisse Loughrey

Alan Rickman’s final screen outing is a textbook exercise in bringing modern warfare to the big screen.

review

Rock the Kasbah

By David Jenkins

This turgid Afghan-based comedy will leave you wondered if Bill Murray will ever star in a good movie again.

review

Au Revoir les Enfants (1987)

By Wally Hammond

Louis Malle’s unsentimental depiction of his own boyhood during the Nazi occupation of France stands the test of time.

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Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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