Toy Story 2 3D

Review by Matt Bochenski @MattLWLies

Directed by

John Lasseter Lee Unkrich

Starring

Joan Cusack Tim Allen Tom Hanks

Anticipation.

A new dimension added to a Pixar classic.

Enjoyment.

Perfection just got more perfect.

In Retrospect.

Toy Story’s reputation remains undimmed.

One of Pixar’s crown jewels revels in both a literal and metaphorical extra dimension.

How do you improve on a masterpiece? Easy: you can’t. But what you can do is give it some 21st century razzle dazzle – a spit and polish and some shiny new 3D paint.

Ahead of this summer’s release of an all new Toy Story adventure in multiple dimensions, the Pixar gang have returned to one of their many finest hours, sprucing up the second outing of Woody and co with some stereoscopic goodness.

The result is both a literal and metaphorical added dimension, one that is applied to breathtaking effect in the film’s (relatively few) long shots, in which the microscopic level of detail in the character models is enough to send jaws plummeting towards the floor.

Does this actually add anything to the experience of the film? Perhaps it will help to hold the attention of jaded adults who’ve seen it a few too many times.

But in all honesty, Toy Story 2 is more than capable of standing on its own two (dimensional) feet, with its heartwarming/breaking tale of friendship and the bittersweet tragedy of growing up only bettered in Pixar’s own Finding Nemo.

Published 21 Jan 2010

Tags: John Lasseter Lee Unkrich Pixar Tom Hanks

Anticipation.

A new dimension added to a Pixar classic.

Enjoyment.

Perfection just got more perfect.

In Retrospect.

Toy Story’s reputation remains undimmed.

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