In Praise Of

How David Cronenberg’s Crash helped me overcome my fear of driving

By Brian Quinn

Following a traumatic childhood accident, this psychosexual oddity empowered me to take back control.

Loss, grief and brotherhood in Shane Meadows’ Dead Man’s Shoes

By Anna Cale

Paddy Considine plays an ex-Para seeking revenge in this hard-hitting psychological thriller from 2004.

How Mae West took on the Hollywood studio system

By Lynsey Ford

In the pre-code era, the trailblazing Hollywood star used her sly humour and sex appeal to thrill audiences.

In praise of Quentin Tarantino, inglourious feminist

By Hermione Sylvester

Accusations that the director’s work is misogynistic for enacting violence against women are wide of the mark.

The Vietnam War movie they wanted you to forget

By Christina Newland

Ignored by the media and undermined by Nixon, Winter Soldier remains a vital snapshot of the counterculture era.

Why Leningrad Cowboys Go America remains a classic music biopic

By Patrick Preziosi

Aki Kaurismäki’s snapshot of a pompadoured polka troupe is one of the great touring movies.

Drop Dead Gorgeous at 20: The cult teen movie 1999 wasn’t ready for

By Beth Webb

How the “most smartest” comedy overcame a box office bashing to find a devoted fanbase.

Sunshine and the existential dilemma of space travel

By Emily Maskell

With NASA to allow tourists to visit the International Space Station from 2020, what lessons can be learned from this 2007 sci-fi thriller?

Born to be Wild: The defiant, laid-back legacy of Easy Rider

By Lynsey Ford

Fifty years ago, Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper birthed arguably the defining film of America’s counterculture era.

Remembering Longtime Companion, a pioneering portrait of the AIDS crisis

By Jack King

Norman René’s compassionate opus remains the only theatrically released film to accurately reflect the epidemic’s impact.

Revisiting Summer of Sam – Spike Lee’s other great heatwave movie

By Justine Smith

A serial killer and sweltering heat make for a lethal cocktail in the director’s underrated 1999 film.

The story of Duke Ellington’s Anatomy of a Murder score

By Adam Scovell

Otto Preminger’s 1959 courtroom drama was the first Hollywood movie to use an African-American composer.

Tetsuo: The Iron Man and the dark side of transhumanism

By Sam Moore

Shin’ya Tsukamoto’s nightmarish 1989 body horror explores the morbid fusion of biology and technology.

Hollywood could still learn a thing or two from Tim Burton’s Batman

By Kambole Campbell

The director’s vision of Gotham City remains one of blockbuster cinema’s greatest creations.

Why Seed of Chucky holds a special place in my heart

By Sam Mauro

As a horror obsessive and trans woman, I found a filthy acceptance in this sleazy Child’s Play sequel.

Why the politics of Derek Jarman’s late films are so important

By Sam Moore

In a time of political uncertainty, his bold representations of queerness remain as vital and relevant as ever.

The Muppet Movie at 40 – Jim Henson’s fuzzy testament to friendship

By Aimee Knight

The birth of the Muppet Cinematic Universe remains a high water mark for family moviemaking.

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Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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