The Consequences of Love

Review by David Jenkins @daveyjenkins

Directed by

Paolo Sorrentino

Starring

Adriano Giannini Olivia Magnani Toni Servillo

Anticipation.

Flew well under the radar.

Enjoyment.

The fine acting, beautiful camera work and a series of clues to work through are consistently engaging.

In Retrospect.

Persevere with the slow bits and you’ll reap the reward of a cracking finale. An unusual and memorable take on the Mafia.

At times frustratingly slow, The Consequences of Love could be criticised for its meandering lack of action.

Estranged from his family, and with only a packet of cigarettes for company, Titta di Giralano’s life in an anonymous Swiss hotel is lonely and emotionless. But for the seductive cinematography that maps out his existence it’d be pretty damn unexciting too.

Subtly and steadily, however, Paolo Sorrentino reveals clues about the secret of Titta’s past, teasing us until the arrival of a cash-filled suitcase brings disturbing details and the Mafia connections that underpin them.

At times frustratingly slow, The Consequences of Love could be criticised for its meandering lack of action. But by shying away from the familiar violence that usually defines the mob movie genre, Sorrentino lights a slow-burning fuse that promises to detonate at any moment.

Its chilling power is evoked by Toni Servillo’s beautifully underplayed performance, the hotel’s prison-like impassivity and the painful mundanity of Titta’s existence.

Published 25 May 2005

Tags: Paolo Sorrentino

Anticipation.

Flew well under the radar.

Enjoyment.

The fine acting, beautiful camera work and a series of clues to work through are consistently engaging.

In Retrospect.

Persevere with the slow bits and you’ll reap the reward of a cracking finale. An unusual and memorable take on the Mafia.

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