Berlin Film Festival

Eight under-the-radar gems from the Berlin Film Festival 2019

By Adam Woodward

Highlights from across this year’s Berlinale, including a hallucinatory war thriller and a metaphysical farce.

Varda by Agnès – first look review

By Ian Mantgani

The first lady of French cinema offers a final, typically fascinating self-portrait.

Amazing Grace – first look review

By Ian Mantgani

Sydney Pollack’s long-lost concert doc shows the Queen of Soul at the height of her pop fame.

What She Said: The Art of Pauline Kael – first look review

By Ella Kemp

This portrait of the work of film critic Pauline Kael is a perfect reminder of why movies matter.

The Operative – first look review

By Ian Mantgani

Diane Kruger and Martin Freeman star in this intriguing tale of espionage in modern-day Tehran.

Watergate – first look review

By Ian Mantgani

Charles Ferguson’s mammoth chronicle of President Nixon’s downfall manages to be at once too detailed and too superficial.

Mr Jones – first look review

By Ian Mantgani

Agnieszka Holland’s biopic of Welsh journalist Gareth Jones is one of the most powerful films at this year’s Berlinale.

Fourteen – first look review

By Ian Mantgani

American filmmaker Dan Sallitt delivers a delicate, subtly devastating portrait of friendship and depression.

El Bar – first look review

By Adam Lee Davies

Álex de la Iglesia’s frisky, single-set survival thriller from Spain loses its steam after an impressive opening act.

Revolution of Sound: Tangerine Dream – first look review

By Adam Lee Davies

A solid docu-homage to the strung-out German synth-proggers and occasional film soundtrackers.

On the Beach At Night Alone – first look review

By David Jenkins

The wistful latest from Korean maestro Hong Sang-soo is powered by an exceptional lead performance.

Call Me by Your Name – first look review

By David Jenkins

Remember that title, as you’ll be hearing a lot about Luca Guadagnino’s sublime summertime romance.

The Other Side of Hope – first look review

By David Jenkins

Finland’s Aki Kaurismäki lights up the Berlin competition with a typically bittersweet response to the migrant crisis.

The Queen of Spain – first look review

By Adam Lee Davies

Penélope Cruz stars in this frolicsome love letter to Spanish cinema’s golden age from director Fernando Trueba.

The Party – first look review

By Adam Lee Davies

Pseudo-intellectual pontificating abounds in Sally Potter’s brisk middle class comedy.

Somniloquies – first look review

By David Jenkins

The directors of Leviathan return with a breathtaking character study of the world’s foremost sleep talker.

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Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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