Adventure

Riddle of Fire review – whimsical and imaginative child’s play

By Hannah Strong

Three precocious kids set out on a quest for blueberry pie in Weston Razooli's throwback adventure film.

review LWLies Recommends

Gasoline Rainbow review – glows brightly

By Katherine McLaughlin

The Ross Brothers create a portrait of youth in revolt in their first fiction film.

review LWLies Recommends

The Garfield Movie review – as messy as a child eating spaghetti

By David Jenkins

Another lacklustre animated foray into the lasagne-smeared world of Jim Davis’ most famous comic creation.

review

Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes review – stop, I want to get off!

By Adam Woodward

The latest instalment in the simian cinema canon is a weak follow-up to the narrative established in its predecessors, as monkey in-fighting develops between various tribes.

review

Love Lies Bleeding review – hot, dirty, fast, combustible

By Hannah Strong

Kristen Stewart and Katy O'Brien are on fire as star-crossed lovers who get into a sweaty mess in Rose Glass's lurid '80s throwback thriller.

review LWLies Recommends

Godzilla x Kong: The New Empire review – big, goofy fun

By David Jenkins

A surprisingly entertaining showdown sequel which opts for no funny stuff and doing the simple things well.

review

Ghostbusters: Frozen Empire review – formulaic and uninspired

By David Jenkins

Shoddy, rushed sequel that rides ramshod over past glories without offering anything new and exciting to this stale franchise.

review

Society of the Snow review – a visceral survival drama

By Emma Fraser

A harrowing yet incredibly human look at survival in the most desperate circumstances from director JA Bayona.

review LWLies Recommends

Madame Web review – did anyone involved in this film actually want to be there?

By Hannah Strong

Dakota Johnson delivers a remarkably disinterested performance as a clairvoyant superhero in this shoddy Spider-Man spin-off.

review

Migration review – A sorely underpowered duck tale

By David Jenkins

A ripe set-up in which a family of ducks migrate in the wrong direction is squandered in this haphazard and empty family animation.

review

The Kitchen review – vindicating and explosive

By Rogan Graham

Daniel Kaluuya and Kibwe Tavares' feature debut is a kinetic, prescient thriller about gentrification and isolation in a near-future version of London.

review LWLies Recommends

The Book of Clarence review – hilarious highs, jumbled lows

By Cheyenne Bunsie

Jeymes Samuel's second feature follows the misadventures of one of the thieves who ended up on the cross next to Jesus Christ himself.

review

The Boy and the Heron review – poetry, philosophy, pure emotion

By Mark Asch

Less a swansong and more a heronsong from the Japanese maestro Hayao Miyazaki, a mystical and ambitious message of hope for the future.

review LWLies Recommends

Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom review – a superhero sequel that sinks

By David Jenkins

Aggressively unmemorable return to a garish CGI Atlantis in which Jason Momoa’s sub-aqua regent wards off another potential apocalypse.

review

Godzilla Minus One review – Precision-tooled fun

By David Jenkins

Our atomic friend returns for a runout on the battered landscape of post-1945 Tokyo in Takashi Yamazaki’s stripped back action epic.

review

Wonka review – Timothée Chalamet is simply sensational

By Adam Woodward

Gather round and listen close... Paul King’s dazzling prequel to Roald Dahl’s beloved story is a joyous expression of pure imagination.

review LWLies Recommends

The Killer review – throwback to the golden age of pulp fiction

By Hannah Strong

Michael Fassbender plays a contract killer suffering some professional setbacks in David Fincher's lean, mean new thriller.

review

Little White Lies Logo

About Little White Lies

Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

Editorial

Design