Berlin Film Festival

El Bar – first look review

By Adam Lee Davies

Álex de la Iglesia’s frisky, single-set survival thriller from Spain loses its steam after an impressive opening act.

Revolution of Sound: Tangerine Dream – first look review

By Adam Lee Davies

A solid docu-homage to the strung-out German synth-proggers and occasional film soundtrackers.

On the Beach At Night Alone – first look review

By David Jenkins

The wistful latest from Korean maestro Hong Sang-soo is powered by an exceptional lead performance.

Call Me by Your Name – first look review

By David Jenkins

Remember that title, as you’ll be hearing a lot about Luca Guadagnino’s sublime summertime romance.

The Other Side of Hope – first look review

By David Jenkins

Finland’s Aki Kaurismäki lights up the Berlin competition with a typically bittersweet response to the migrant crisis.

The Queen of Spain – first look review

By Adam Lee Davies

Penélope Cruz stars in this frolicsome love letter to Spanish cinema’s golden age from director Fernando Trueba.

The Party – first look review

By Adam Lee Davies

Pseudo-intellectual pontificating abounds in Sally Potter’s brisk middle class comedy.

Somniloquies – first look review

By David Jenkins

The directors of Leviathan return with a breathtaking character study of the world’s foremost sleep talker.

Spoor – first look review

By David Jenkins

Polish director Agnieszka Holland returns with an enigmatic woodland-set murder mystery.

A Fantastic Woman – first look review

By David Jenkins

Sebastián Lelio’s follow up to 2013’s Gloria is a surprisingly inert and cliché-driven portrait of a trans woman.

Final Portrait – first look review

By Adam Lee Davies

Stanley Tucci returns behind the camera for this slight, satisfying chamber drama on the process of artistic creation.

Django – first look review

By Adam Lee Davies

A nimble-fingered movie biopic of the ace guitar picker who entertained the Nazis opens the 2017 Berlinale.

The Dinner – first look review

By Adam Lee Davies

Cinema dictates that movie dinner dates are supposed to go bad. This Berlinale competition entry carries on that tradition.

Wild Mouse – first look review

By David Jenkins

Josef Hader’s mid-life meltdown comedy has just enough madcap laughs for it to pass muster.

A Quiet Passion – first look review

By Adam Woodward

A stunning performance from Cynthia Nixon anchors Terence Davies’ unromantic portrait of reclusive American poet Emily Dickinson.

Things to Come – first look review

By Adam Woodward

Isabelle Huppert stars as a woman calmly losing control in Mia Hansen-Løve’s life-affirming fifth feature.

War on Everyone – first look review

By Adam Woodward

Alexander Skarsgård and Michael Peña put the “blue” and “line” in thin blue line in this salty buddy cop comedy.

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Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, LWLies has been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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