Reviews

Mon Roi

By Adam Woodward

Emmanuelle Bercot and Vincent Cassel tear each other apart in this so-so relationship drama.

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The Daughter

By Josh Slater-Williams

There’s a touch of Thomas Vinterberg about this impressive Aussie debut from Simon Stone.

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The Trust

By Phil W Bayles

Elijah Wood and Nicolas Cage play a pair of crooked Las Vegas cops in this breezy heist caper.

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Love & Friendship

By David Jenkins

The peerless Whit Stillman returns with an ensemble Jane Austen adaptation like no other.

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Warcraft: The Beginning

By Anton Bitel

Despite the silly names and cheesy nerdism there’s plenty of fun to be had in Duncan Jones’ video game adaptation.

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Streetdance Family

By Alex Chambers

Slick moves aside there’s little to take away from this high-energy, low-drama dance doc.

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Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)

By David Jenkins

Don’t miss this newly restored director’s cut version of Steven Spielberg’s sci-fi opus.

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Bobby

By Adam Woodward

Relive England’s sole World Cup triumph 50 years on via this timely tribute to a true footballing icon.

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Money Monster

By David Jenkins

Jodie Foster swings for the Wall Street fat cats and misses by miles in this thin thriller which premiered in Cannes.

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Chicken

By Elisa Adams

There’s a hint of fowl play in Joe Stephenson’s refreshingly bold study of a complex relationship.

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Romeo and Juliet (1968)

By Alex Chambers

Franco Zeffirelli’s traditional retelling of the most famous love story ever told is one for Shakespeare completists only.

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The Neon Demon

By Adam Woodward

Elle Fanning bares her soul in Nicolas Winding Refn’s beautiful dark twisted fantasy.

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Departure

By Mathilde Dumazet

Young male love comes to the fore in this moving coming-of-ager from first-time director Andrew Steggall.

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Heart of a Dog

By Glenn Heath Jr

It’s impossible not to be charmed by Laurie Anderson’s reflective canine essay film.

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Journey to the Shore

By David Jenkins

A ghost trapped in limbo accompanies us on a romantic road-trip, but only tedium ensues.

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Sing Street

By David Jenkins

Once director John Carney serves up a sugary crowd-pleaser that’s too soft-centred for its own good.

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X-Men: Apocalypse

By Adam Woodward

The third instalment in the rebooted comic book franchise is a colossal failure on every conceivable level.

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About Little White Lies

Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, LWLies has been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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