Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, LWLies has been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

Editorial

David Jenkins

Adam Woodward

Sophie Monks Kaufman

Design

Timba Smits

Laurène Boglio

Oliver Stafford

LWLies Recommends

Janis: Little Girl Blue

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

The iconic American singer-songwriter gets a fitting tribute from doc heavyweights Amy Berg and Alex Gibney.

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Innocence of Memories

By David Jenkins

Director Grant Gee’s cinematic love letter to Istanbul doubles as a profoundly moving study of memory.

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Youth

By Adam Woodward

A legend of British cinema teams with Italy’s master of screen sensuality to tell a sparkling tale of nostalgia and sorrow.

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Spotlight

By Emma Simmonds

Tom McCarthy delivers an old-school journalistic thriller with the help of a sensational all-star cast.

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The Assassin

By Violet Lucca

Hou Hsiao-Hsien’s elegant martial arts tale is one the most beautiful films you’ll see all year.

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Room

By David Jenkins

Brie Larson shines in this deceptively life-affirming drama about a young mother forced to raise her son in isolation.

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Le Mépris (1963)

By Wally Hammond

Is this Brigitte Bardot-starring satirical drama Jean-Luc Godard’s best movie? We think so.

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The Danish Girl

By David Ehrlich

Eddie Redmayne and Alicia Vikander prove a perfect match in this tender transgender drama.

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Joy

By Adam Cook

An effervescent Jennifer Lawrence elevates the sly comedic tone of David O Russell’s eccentric film.

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Star Wars: The Force Awakens

By David Jenkins

JJ Abrams delivers big time with his supremely classy and stirring addition to this cherished franchise.

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By the Sea

By David Jenkins

As a director, writer and performer, Angelina Jolie-Pitt has finally come into her own.

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When Harry Met Sally… (1989)

By Glenn Heath Jr

Nora Ephron and Rob Reiner’s seminal rom-com remains as fresh and feisty as ever.

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Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict

By Emma Simmonds

Director Lisa Immordino Vreeland offers a fascinating and outrageously funny look at the New York bohemian.

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The Forbidden Room

By Anton Bitel

Lose yourself in the mind-bending majesty of Guy Maddin and Evan Johnson’s cine odyssey.

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The Revenant

By Adam Woodward

Leonardo DiCaprio feels the wrath of man in Alejandro González Iñárritu’s awesomely violent revenge western.

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Chemsex

By David Jenkins

Directors William Fairman and Max Gogarty deliver a vital exposé on a dangerous new trend within the gay community.

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Sunset Song

By David Jenkins

This Terence Davies passion project showcases an incandescent performance from Agyness Deyn.

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Creed

By Ashley Clark

A franchise is reborn in sensational fashion courtesy of director Ryan Coogler and star Michael B Jordan.

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My Skinny Sister

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

Anorexia as seen from all vantages within the nuclear family is the subject of this impressive drama.

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Carol

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

Todd Haynes’ period romance starring Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara is a beaming masterpiece.

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Bridge of Spies

By David Ehrlich

A Cold War spy thriller from Steven Spielberg that’s as sleek, robust and alluring as a vintage Rolls Royce.

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The Russian Woodpecker

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

Ukrainian artist Feder Alexandrovich serves as a key witness to the untold story of the Chernobyl disaster.

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Güeros

By David Jenkins

Director Alonso Ruizpalacios takes us on a tour of his native Mexico City in this first-time feature to savour.

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My Nazi Legacy

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

Two German men confront the sins of their fathers in this exceptional documentary.

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Tell Spring Not to Come This Year

By David Jenkins

Troops in Afghanistan have trouble knowing the enemy in this impressive doc.

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Tangerine

By Katherine McLaughlin

This euphoric night-before-Christmas revenge caper is one of the year’s most purely enjoyable films.

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Microbe & Gasoline

By David Jenkins

This bittersweet summer road trip planned and orchestrated by Michel Gondry is one of the director’s finest.

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Brief Encounter (1945)

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

Rural train platforms were transformed forever by this high peak of screen romance from David Lean.

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The Closer We Get

By David Jenkins

Karen Guthrie turns her camera on her family and uncovers a host of strange and beautiful secrets.

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Crimson Peak

By David Jenkins

Guillermo del Toro’s luxuriant Gothic romance is the full cinematic package.

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Taxi Tehran

By Glenn Heath Jr

This lyrical, on-the-fly road movie about the cinematic and poetic value of daily existence is a must see.

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Letters to Max

By Charlotte Keeys

Eric Baudelaire travels to the disputed territory of Abkhazia in this haunting documentary.

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Macbeth

By Anton Bitel

A vital reimagining of ʻThe Scottish Play’ with stellar turns from Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard.

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Orion: The Man Who Would Be King

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

Don’t miss Jeanie Finlay’s portrait of an enigmatic Elvis impersonator.

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Horse Money

By Jordan Cronk

Pedro Costa returns with his first feature since 2006. The result is nothing short of spectacular.

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Steamboat Bill, Jr (1928)

By Phil Concannon

Don’t miss this chance to witness Buster Keaton work his extraordinary magic on the big screen.

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A Girl at My Door

By Emma Simmonds

Social justice underpins a gripping detective story in this highly impressive first work from South Korea’s July Jung.

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Tangerines

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

Estonia’s first Oscar-nominated feature gleefully exposes the inherent absurdity of war.

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In Cold Blood (1967)

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

Richard Brooks’ adaptation of Truman Capote's seminal work is well worth revisiting.

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The Second Mother

By Katherine McLaughlin

The inequalities of Brazilian are writ large in this delightful upstairs/downstairs drama.

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American Ultra

By David Jenkins

This ultraviolent tale of smalltown puppy love stars Kristen Stewart and Jesse Eisenberg at their best.

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Aaaaaaaah!

By David Jenkins

Actor Steve Oram has decided to make a movie, and the results are spectacularly disturbing.

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45 Years

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay are on top form in Andrew Haigh’s devastating relationship drama.

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L’Eclisse (1962)

By David Jenkins

Don’t miss this chance to catch Michelangelo Antonioni’s modernist masterpiece.

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Straight Outta Compton

By Craig Williams

The NWA story is told in the style of a luxe, classic-era studio biopic. And it's scintillating.

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Theeb

By Bekzhan Sarsenbay

A subtle and nuanced range western set in the Middle East during the late Ottoman period.

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Hard to be a God

By Matt Thrift

Alexsey German’s 15-years-in-the-making political allegory is a visceral, sensory, jaw-dropping masterpiece.

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The Diary of a Teenage Girl

By David Jenkins

Bel Powley shines in Marielle Heller’s refreshingly non-judgmental chronicle of teenage sexuality in ’70s San Francisco.

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Iris

By Matt Thrift

Albert Maysles’ penultimate film suggests that rabid consumerism can be refined and charming.

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Man with a Movie Camera (1929)

By Trevor Johnston

The winner of a recent poll to discover the greatest ever documentary is re-released.

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Inside Out

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

Pixar are firing on all pistons with this wonderful, colour-coded exploration of a child’s inner psyche.

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Eden

By David Jenkins

Mia Hansen-Løve’s extraordinary fourth feature is about the impossibility of beat-matching life and fashion.

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Love & Mercy

By Cormac O'Brien

Two chapters in the tumultuous life of volatile Beach Boys front-man, Brian Wilson.

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P’tit Quinquin

By Anton Bitel

The high priest of gloom, Bruno Dumont, returns with a comedy which is part Jacques Tati, part Twin Peaks.

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Touch of Evil (1958)

By David Jenkins

Orson Welles is some kind of a man in this grisly, ultra-melancholic border-town noir from 1958.

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Song of the Sea

By David Jenkins

Do Ghibli and Pixar have a new rival in Irish director Tomm Moore? This stunning film would suggest they do.

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Magic Mike XXL

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

Channing Tatum leads a troupe of sensitive male strippers in this explosively sexy road trip movie.

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Slow West

By Adam Woodward

Michael Fassbender shows his true grit in this gratifying and extremely violent saunter through Old America.

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Les Combattants

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

Adèle Haenel’s ingenue allure elevates Thomas Cailley's sweet-natured survivalist romance.

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Mr Holmes

By David Jenkins

Sir Ian McKellen is riveting in this moving and humane look at Sherlock Holmes in his twilight years.

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The Look of Silence

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

Joshua Oppenheimer’s bloodcurdling and brilliant follow-up to his doc smash, The Act of Killing.

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Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films

By Katherine McLaughlin

Crash, bang, wallop! Don't miss this lid-lifting exposé on the trailblazing B-movie studio.

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Timbuktu

By David Ehrlich

Do not miss this scintillating and poetic study of political extremism from director Abderrahmane Sissako.

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The Supreme Price

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

This rousing documentary provides a personal, feminist entry point to Nigeria’s pro-Democracy movement.

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Mad Max: Fury Road

By Adam Woodward

The outer chassis may look battered and bruised, but there’s well-oiled action perfection under the bonnet.

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Stray Dogs

By David Jenkins

Tsai Ming-liang’s (s)low-fi masterpiece Stray Dogs finally makes it to UK cinemas.

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Phoenix

By David Jenkins

Prepare to be floored by Christian Petzold’s masterful postwar melo, particularly for its astonishing final shot.

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A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence

By David Ehrlich

Sweden’s Roy Andersson offers a singular take on the human condition in this triumphant trilogy-closer.

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Jauja

By David Jenkins

Viggo Mortensen teams up with Argentinian visionary Lisandro Alonso to deliver one of the most singularly compelling films of the year.

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John Wick

By Luke Channell

Keanu Reeves delivers his best performance in years in this slick redemption-based actioner.

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The Voices

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

Talking household pets are the source of a murderous rampage in Marjane Satrapi’s wicked, comic-tinged slasher movie.

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Dreamcatcher

By David Jenkins

A sex-worker turned feminist-force-of-nature is Kim Longinotto’s guide to Chicago in her characteristically great documentary.

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Selma

By David Jenkins

“Selma Now!” Ava DuVernay’s vital civil rights drama is the film Martin Luther King deserved.

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Inherent Vice

By David Jenkins

Paul Thomas Anderson charts the end of the hippy dream in this blissful gumshoe chimera.

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Mr Turner

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

Timothy Spall grunts his way to glory in Mike Leigh’s elegantly composed portrait of JMW Turner.

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Two Days, One Night

By David Jenkins

If you only do one thing this year, make sure you catch this shattering masterpiece by the Dardenne brothers.

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Boyhood

By Vadim Rizov

Ellar Coltrane grows up in public as the central, glorious spectacle in Richard Linklater's masterpiece.

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Goodbye To Language

By David Jenkins

Jean-Luc Godard’s dazzling 3D dirty bomb.

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Godzilla

By Adam Lee Davies

Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla is one of the great blockbusters of modern times. Believe.

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Under the Skin

By Violet Lucca

Jonathan Glazer’s erotic and philosophically-inclined feminist sci-fi fable is an extraordinary one-off.

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The Godfather: Part II (1974)

By Adam Woodward

Francis Ford Coppola’s magnum opus gets a big screen outing, see it if only to be able to understand The Simpsons better.

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Bastards

By Violet Lucca

French master Claire Denis gets seedy and sinister with an extraordinary modern riff on the classic noir thriller.

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Inside Llewyn Davis

By Adam Woodward

Cold exteriors and warm interiors combine in the Coen brothers’ rhapsodic portrait of a ’60s folk singer.

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Leviathan

By David Jenkins

One of the year’s most extraordinary films is an experimental documentary about North Sea fishing.

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Computer Chess

By David Jenkins

Andrew Bujalski switches gears with a lo-fi marvel that channels the spirit of Robert Altman.

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Short Term 12

By Adam Woodward

A barnstorming performance from Brie Larson elevates this bittersweet foster care drama.

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The Great Beauty

By Paul Fairclough

Shades of Fellini elevate Paolo Sorrentino’s spirited, deeply affecting drama.

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Upstream Color

By Adam Lee Davies

Baffling, intoxicating, elegant, Shane Carruth's long-overdue follow-up to Primer is among the year's best.

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Frances Ha

By Anton Bitel

Ahoy sexy! In which the great Greta Grewig stakes a convincing claim to the thrown of most loveable living screen actress.

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The Act Of Killing

By David Jenkins

Joshua Oppenheimer mixes the romance of the movies with the horror of genocide in this incredible one-off.

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Like Someone in Love

By Andrew Schenker

Iranian maestro Abbas Kiarostami heads to Tokyo for this multi-faceted jewel.

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Before Midnight

By David Jenkins

Richard Linklater makes it a trilogy for his beloved walkie-talkie love saga. And this one’s possibly the best of the lot.

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It’s Such a Beautiful Day

By Glenn Heath Jr

The first feature film from Austin-based animation powerhouse, Don Hertzfeldt, is a rapturous joy to behold.

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Spring Breakers

By Adam Woodward

Is this neon-hued apocalyptic party movie Harmony Korine’s masterpiece? We think it might be...

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Zero Dark Thirty

By Simon Crook

Kathryn Bigelow’s rapid response to the death of Osama Bin Laden is a taut and morally ambiguous procedural for the ages.

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Django Unchained

By Jonathan Crocker

Hate, murder and revenge as Quentin Tarantino goes west. Well, south.

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Amour

By David Jenkins

A pair of astounding performances are the pillars that prop up Michael Haneke's formidable answer to the Hollywood weepie.

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The Master

By Adam Woodward

Paul Thomas Anderson’s spiritual post-war love story will restore your faith in cinema.

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Holy Motors

By David Jenkins

French enfant terrible Leos Carax finally comes good with this sublime and surreal ode to acting, moviemaking, Paris and the whole damn thing.

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Tabu

By David Jenkins

This sublime Portuguese fantasia from director Miguel Gomes will likely feature heavily on best of year lists.

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The Turin Horse

By Matt Thrift

Hungarian colossus Béla Tarr’s ‘last film’ is a magnificent, towering achievement.

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This Is Not A Film

By David Jenkins

Jafar Panahi’s extraordinary self-portrait/protest piece is the gift that keeps on giving.

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Once Upon a Time in Anatolia

By David Jenkins

Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s hypnotic metaphysical noir is towering, tough and very, very pretty.

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Patience (After Sebald)

By David Jenkins

If you haven’t read the book, you’ll want to. If you have read the book, you’ll want to read it again.

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Oslo, August 31st

By Paul Bradshaw

An astounding achievement, Joachim Trier’s haunting film will stay with you for weeks.

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We Need to Talk About Kevin

By Jason Goodyer

Lynne Ramsay’s first film for nine years is a dizzying visual trip anchored by Tilda Swinton’s superlative central performance.

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Super 8

By Matt Glasby

JJ Abrams delivers big in this enthralling nostalgia trip to small-town USA circa the 1970s.

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The Tree of Life

By Alan Mack

A glorious ode to the improbability of existence which asks us to cherish the simple processes of living and loving.

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Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives

By Jason Wood

Uncle Boonmee is by turns ironic, poignant, profound and languidly sensuous and erotic.

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The Social Network

By Jonathan Williams

The Social Network may not have the impact on the world that Facebook has, but when the story is told this well, it doesn’t have to.

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Dogtooth

By Laurence Boyce

Dogtooth is a film that delights in disconcerting the viewer and refuses to supply any easy answers.

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