Sundance Film Festival

Sharp Stick – first-look review

By Hannah Strong

A naïve 26-year-old sets her sights on a sexual awakening in Lena Dunham’s brash and honest second feature.

Am I OK? – first-look review

By Emily Maskell

Dakota Johnson grapples with her sexuality and the potential loss of her best friend in Tig Notaro and Stephanie Allynne’s romantic drama.

God’s Country – first-look review

By Caitlin Quinlan

Thandiwe Newton plays a college professor who faces off against a group of hunters in Julian Higgins’ precise and prescient debut.

You Won’t Be Alone – first-look review

By Ariel Klinghoffer

Goran Stolesvski weaves a strange and sumptuous tale of womanhood against the backdrop of ancient Macedonia.

The Cathedral – first-look review

By Daniel Schindel

Ricky D’Ambrose roots a child's personal narrative in the context of wider American change in his impressionistic feature.

Girl Picture – first-look review

By Emily Maskell

Alli Haapasalo creates an intimate coming-of-age story about two best friends on the cusp of adulthood.

Cha Cha Real Smooth – first-look review

By Hannah Strong

Cooper Raiff plays a postgrad party starter who falls for an older woman in the writer/director/actor’s frustrating second feature.

Alice – first-look review

By Leila Latif

KeKe Palmer plays an enslaved woman who makes a shocking discovery in Krystin Ver Linden’s misjudged thriller.

Something in the Dirt – first-look review

By Anton Bitel

Filmmaking duo Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead discover an ominous paranormal entity in their meta fifth feature.

When You Finish Saving the World – first-look review

By Hannah Strong

Jesse Eisenberg makes his directorial debut with an adaptation of his own highly-praised podcast drama.

Fresh – first-look review

By Hannah Strong

It’s a classic tale of boy eats girl in Mimi Cave’s directorial debut, but the flavour profile is off.

Nothing Compares – first-look review

By Ed Gibbs

A direct and intimate look at the turbulent life of Irish singer Sinead O’Connor.

We Met in Virtual Reality – first-look review

By Ed Gibbs

The first feature doc to be shot entirely inside the world of social VR is a rich, uplifting experience.

Dual – first-look review

By Brianna Zigler

Riley Stearns' latest boasts an intriguing premise and a solid central performance, but its vagueness is to is detriment.

Are digital film festivals here to stay?

By David Jenkins

Following successful editions of Sundance and Rotterdam in 2021, the future for these events looks virtual.

How documentary cinema is reframing the Civil Rights era

By Nick Joyner

At this year’s Sundance Film Festival, three films broadened our understanding of the fight against racial discrimination.

This year’s Sundance showcased a different kind of high school movie

By Thomas Flew

A trio of documentaries revealed different aspects of the American education system.

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Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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