Drama

The Taste of Things review – every frame is delectable

By David Jenkins

Juliette Binoche and Benoît Magimel play late 19th century gourmets in Tran Ahn Hung’s scintillating epic of proto-foodie passions.

review LWLies Recommends

The Iron Claw review – a heartbreaking dissection of fraternal tragedy

By Hannah Strong

Sean Durkin's searing new drama focuses on the incredible story of the Von Erich Brothers, who became heavyweights in the wrestling world, but were dogged by personal tragedy.

review LWLies Recommends

Bob Marley: One Love review – a low-calorie music bio

By David Jenkins

An ultra-conventional jukebox biog where a celebration of the music trumps a true exploration of the man.

review

The Settlers review – a brutally violent anti-western

By David Jenkins

This haunting debut by Felipe Gálvez Haberle dismantles the violent colonial trappings of the classic western.

review

American Fiction review – wry literary satire is a mixed bag

By David Jenkins

Jeffrey Wright shines in a bold contemporary arts satire that doesn’t quite manage to hit all of its targets.

review

The Zone of Interest review – a towering, awful masterwork

By Hannah Strong

Jonathan Glazer's stark film about the domestic routine of the Höss family next door to Auschwitz is a colossal, profoundly disturbing achievement in filmmaking.

review LWLies Recommends

The Color Purple review – rides on its stellar performances

By David Jenkins

Blitz Bazawule delivers an all singing, all dancing update of Alice Walker’s harrowing story of women in postbellum Georgia.

review

Samsara review – a quiet, radical masterwork

By Neil Young

Lois Patiño travels from Laos to Zanzibar via the bardo in this unique and jaw-dropping tale of bodily transcendence.

review LWLies Recommends

All of Us Strangers review – a supernova of a film

By Hannah Strong

Andrew Scott and Paul Mescal are electric in Andrew Haigh's twist on the modern ghost story, adapted from Taichi Yamada's cult novel.

review LWLies Recommends

The Kitchen review – vindicating and explosive

By Rogan Graham

Daniel Kaluuya and Kibwe Tavares' feature debut is a kinetic, prescient thriller about gentrification and isolation in a near-future version of London.

review LWLies Recommends

The Book of Clarence review – hilarious highs, jumbled lows

By Cheyenne Bunsie

Jeymes Samuel's second feature follows the misadventures of one of the thieves who ended up on the cross next to Jesus Christ himself.

review

The Holdovers review – the most scintillating festive movie in years

By Lillian Crawford

A curmudgeonly teacher, a grieving cook and a petulant young student find themselves thrown together for the holidays in Alexander Payne's excellent Christmassy dramedy.

review LWLies Recommends

Poor Things review – Lanthimos at his most playful and comedic

By Savina Petkova

Emma Stone gives a career-defining performance in Yorgos Lanthimos’ opulent provocation about the human body as a nexus for pleasure and pain.

review LWLies Recommends

One Life review – protect Anthony Hopkins at all costs

By Adam Woodward

Anthony Hopkins is sensational in James Hawes' otherwise fairly conventional biopic of Nicholas Winton, who was responsible for rescuing hundreds of Jewish children from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia.

review

Ferrari review – Driver is fantastic, Cruz is even better

By David Jenkins

Adam Driver portrays the single-minded Enzo Ferrari in his middle-age following the death of his son Dino in Michael Mann's unconventional take on the biographical drama.

review

Priscilla review – subtle and sensational

By Hannah Strong

A star is born in Sofia Coppola's biographical drama based on the relationship between Priscilla and Elvis Presley, with Cailee Spaeny delivering a remarkable performance.

review LWLies Recommends

The Boy and the Heron review – poetry, philosophy, pure emotion

By Mark Asch

Less a swansong and more a heronsong from the Japanese maestro Hayao Miyazaki, a mystical and ambitious message of hope for the future.

review LWLies Recommends

Little White Lies Logo

About Little White Lies

Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

Editorial

Design