Psycho vs Psycho – Hitchcock’s classic vs Gus Van Sant’s remake

A side-by-side video comparison of the seminal 1960 horror and its near-identical 1998 update.

Video

Leigh Singer

@Leigh_Singer

You often hear film fans bemoaning the unwanted and unnecessary nature of remakes, especially when it concerns a cherished work that holds a certain amount of nostalgia value. But is there ever any merit in reimagining or updating a sacred cinematic text?

In the first in a new video essay series entitled Remake/Remodel, Leigh Singer explores this highly contentious trend by analysing Alfred Hitchcock’s seminal 1960 horror, Psycho, and its near-identical 1998 update, as directed by Gus Van Sant.

He starts by looking at the fundamental differences between the films, paying close attention to structure and pacing, before presenting a fascinating side-by-side breakdown of several key moments, including the iconic shower scene – which in the case of Van Sant comprises almost twice the number of shots.

Watch the full video below and subscribe to our YouTube channel for more great video essays.

Published 10 Apr 2019

Tags: Alfred Hitchcock Gus Van Sant Remake Remodel

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