In Praise Of

In defence of Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull

By Alex Flood

Is Indy’s fourth outing really as bad as everyone remembers?

Discover the movie riddles of Angela Schanelec

By David Jenkins

Now is the time to see the challenging and moving work of this little-known German auteur.

Why I love Mark Ruffalo’s performance in Zodiac

By Hannah Woodhead

As beleaguered detective Dave Toschi, Ruffalo turns in arguably the finest turn of his career to date.

Re-examining the challenging eroticism of In the Cut

By Justine Smith

Jane Campion’s much maligned 2003 thriller offers a vital subversion of the male gaze.

The serene, sophisticated beauty of Claire Denis’ Chocolat

By Sophie Monks Kaufman

The French writer/director’s debut feature from 1988 is an elegant, perfectly poised character study.

How A Taste of Honey put a female spin on the British New Wave

By Stephen Puddicombe

Shelagh Delaney’s voice stood out from the angry young men who dominated British cinema in the mid 20th century.

My Neighbour Totoro at 30: In praise of Hayao Miyazaki’s gentle giant

By Beth Webb

How this great grey tree-dweller became the Studio Ghibli co-founder’s most beloved creation.

Why I love Marisa Tomei’s performance in My Cousin Vinny

By Catherine Pearson

With her strong self-belief and striking dress sense, Mona Lisa Vito is a character we can all get behind.

How Once Upon a Time in the West reflects the social anxiety of 1968

By Dan Einav

Sergio Leone’s landmark western, which turns 50 this year, is a fascinating product of its time.

Morvern Callar and the search for something beautiful

By Tom Williams

Lynne Ramsay’s masterful second feature from 2002 offers a visceral depiction of grief and longing.

The Long Goodbye: Robert Altman’s hooray for Hollywood

By Sam May

This 1973 pulp classic sees Elliott Gould’s Philip Marlowe navigate LA’s seedy underbelly.

Why Death Wish’s pro-gun politics are just as complex as ever

By Justine Smith

The film’s glamorisation of vigilante justice resonated with an increasingly paranoid audience in 1974.

The surreal, stylistic brilliance of Dark City

By Danilo Castro

Alex Proyas’ homage to classic tech-noirs like Blade Runner, Brazil and Akira was released 20 years ago.

Werner Herzog’s ski jumping film is essential viewing this Winter Olympics

By Harry Harris

The German director’s 1974 short The Great Ecstasy of Woodcarver Steiner shows why sport is so compelling.

Why George A Romero’s Night of the Living Dead still gets under our skin

By Adam Scovell

Released 50 years ago, the director’s lo-fi debut is filled with potent imagery and political resonance.

Revisiting Blade II: Guillermo del Toro’s slick superhero B-movie

By Padraig Cotter

With its sympathetic monsters and distinct visuals, this 2002 sequel is the director’s most underrated film.

How Cronos blurs the line between man and monster

By Danilo Castro

The seed for a career-long obsession is planted in Guillermo del Toro’s debut feature from 1993.

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About Little White Lies

Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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