In Praise Of

Mulholland Drive: The Musical

By Adam Nayman

Is David Lynch’s warped Tinseltown satire from 2001 a contemporary riff on one of Hollywood’s classic-era staples?

The high-octane homoeroticism of John Woo’s Hard Boiled

By David Pountain

The director’s explosive spectacle deconstructs masculinity, sexuality and the action genre itself.

Is this the most authentic boxing movie ever made?

By Joel Blackledge

John Huston’s Fat City is not a straightforward underdog story.

Why the identity crisis in Ghost in the Shell still resonates today

By Greg Evans

In Mamoru Oshii’s classic anime, characters seek individuality within an increasingly artificial society.

The groovy, gruesome legacy of Evil Dead 2

By Stephen Puddicombe

Released 30 years ago, Sam Raimi’s blood-drenched horror-comedy is as grotesque and hilarious as ever.

The infamous, irresistible story of Hollywood’s most bitter feud

By Stephen Puddicombe

Bette Davis and Joan Crawford’s anti-chemistry is palpable in What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? from 1962.

Why Angel Heart still haunts us 30 years on

By William Carroll

Alan Parker’s violent tale of private detectives and devil worship is a heady blend of neo-noir and horror.

In praise of Jesse Eisenberg in The Social Network

By James Luxford

The actor’s sly take on Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg casts a spotlight on the dark side of success.

In defence of Rollerball – the capitalist satire come good

By Nathan Smith

John McTiernan’s maligned 2002 remake is one of the sharper anti-capitalist films of modern times.

In praise of 9 to 5 and the ’80s career woman

By Simran Hans

How a socialist feminist fantasy kickstarted a trend for female-fronted mainstream comedies.

Why Wendy and Lucy remains a vital piece of American cinema

By Joel Blackledge

Kelly Reichardt’s low-key anti-drama from 2008 offers a sobering look at poverty in small town USA.

Why Zodiac remains David Fincher’s most puzzling masterpiece

By Tim Cooke

The director’s true-crime chiller is as tricky and compelling as ever.

Andy Warhol’s Bad is a feminist masterpiece that’s too good to ignore

By Leigh Clark

This subversive cult classic imagines a world of empowered women.

Why we need more films like Medium Cool in our post-truth times

By Caitlin Quinlan

Haskell Wexler’s film brilliantly blurs the line between reality and story.

Is this the Coen brothers’ most underrated movie?

By Dan Einav

The Man Who Wasn’t There is a film without levity, hope or redemption – and it’s one of the directors’ very best.

In praise of Bob Roberts – the political satire that got it spot on

By Anastasia Miari

The events of Tim Robbins’ 1992 directorial debut feel scarily prophetic when viewed today.

How Roots’ cries from the past are echoed in America’s present

By Roxanne Sancto

The 1977 series and its remake show that while the world may have changed, the fight is far from over.

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About Little White Lies

Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, LWLies has been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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