An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power

Review by Louise Busfield

Directed by

Bonni Cohen Jon Shenk

Starring

Al Gore George W Bush Hilary Ashford-Ng

Anticipation.

Oh no, another movie sequel…

Enjoyment.

An informative film on the dangers of climate change from a truly passionate man.

In Retrospect.

Thought-provoking and oddly hopeful for a subject that seems so bleak.

An impassioned Al Gore returns to explain (again) how climate change is killing the planet and what we can do to save it.

It’s been a decade since environmentalist and former Vice President of the United States, Al Gore, delivered his original warning on the dangers of climate change in An Inconvenient Truth, and the human race, it would seem, is still busy destroying the earth. Speaking to a crowd already familiar with the dangers of eco devastation, the subject remains just as important now as it did back then.

Gore previously stated that all our actions have consequences and that the earth will die quickly if we do not do something about it, pronto. It therefore seems odd to now have a sequel essentially telling us the same things again. Are all our changes in behaviour actually benefiting the earth? What more can we do? Well apparently a lot more.

Following Gore across the continents, directors Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk film the devastating effects fossil fuels are having on our planet and the murky political considerations that stand in the way of fixing it. The film does, however, express its congratulations on getting so far. With solar power booming, climate science in good shape and much cooperation with international allies, things are looking up, despite a Commander in Chief who is hellbent on ruining everything. The future, Gore contends, is not so bleak after all, and it’s his endless, energetic sense of hope that powers the film.

It’s a thought provoking and informative film, but only sporadically compelling. The famous slideshow is still present, with a few updates on current conditions, but it’s the film’s relationship with real people that really gives it an edge this time around. Showing us the appalling conditions in Chile, India, Texas, and Miami, the film provides a gut wrenching feeling of guilt and uselessness combined with an utter determination to make things right. However, this fervour only lasts a few minutes, and maybe that’s our problem? According to Gore it all comes down to two simple things: common sense and optimism.

The film doesn’t try to wake people up to the thought of climate change, as those who choose to acknowledge it are already awake. It’s not going to convert the non-believers that global warming exists because, unfortunately those cynics will likely avoid this film like the plague. Therefore it begs the question, did this film actually need to be made? It is, however a good film for people wanting to re-engage with an important subject, one that if not discussed often enough, can be pushed to the side and forgotten about. Let’s just hope we wont need an Another Inconvenient Sequel: The Problem’s Still Here documentary in another ten years telling us how awful we all actually are.

Published 15 Aug 2017

Tags: Al Gore Climate change Global warming

Anticipation.

Oh no, another movie sequel…

Enjoyment.

An informative film on the dangers of climate change from a truly passionate man.

In Retrospect.

Thought-provoking and oddly hopeful for a subject that seems so bleak.

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