Free Fire

We’ve dedicated our latest print edition to the hardboiled mayhem of Ben Wheatley’s Free Fire, in which the British writer/director gathers up a coterie of charismatic chums and has them shoot one another in a filthy, abandoned factory. The film is proof (were it needed) of Wheatley’s mastery of the film medium, particularly the way he’s able to produce breathtaking screen fireworks from the most rudimentary of materials.

Free Fire is a film that is as fun to watch as it reportedly was to make. In this new issue of LWLies, Wheatley takes us on a magical mystery tour of Brighton, where the film was shot, while telling the story of how he got to where he is today. We in turn took inspiration from the film’s high-octane thrills to explore the outer expanses of this terribly entertaining, single set stand-off.

Our cover has been created by LWLies creative director Timba Smits, who drew inspiration from the short-lived 1970s kids comic ‘Action’, which delivered visceral violence to a generation of knee-highs.

In this issue…

Gentle Ben
Adam Woodward heads down to the English seaside town of Brighton to take a stroll with Free Fire director Ben Wheatley.

The World’s Toughest Ben Wheatley Quiz
Adam Nayman, author of Ben Wheatley: Chaos and Confusion, devises some bastard-hard BW multiple choices.

Grand Larsony
Ella Donald tells story of how Brie Larson was finally able to wave goodbye to second-tier archetype roles to become one of the world’s hottest actors.

Polygraph Test #1 – Sharlto Copley
The South African leading man answers a series of questions on Armie Hammer.

Polygraph Test #2 – Armie Hammer
The honey-toned actor answers a series of questions on Jack Reynor

Polygraph Test #3 – Jack Reynor
The Irish upstart answers a series of questions on Sharlto Copley

Call to Action
Who remembers ‘Action’, the most gratuitously violent kids comic strip ever made? We do… Words by Paul Fairclough.

Gun-Fu Hustle
Nick Pinkerton lavishes praise on Hong Kong maestro John Woo, architect of the time-honoured bullet ballet.

Threads #1
A new fashion column by Christina Newland looking at movies through the prism of clothing. This issue’s focus: the wide-collared shirt.

In review

Mulholland Drive reframed as a musical, by Adam Nayman; The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki by Adam Woodward; Catfight by David Jenkins; Raw by Anton Bitel; Neruda by Ben Nicholson; Spaceship by Aimee Knight; The Handmaiden by Abbey Bender; The Eyes of My Mother by Dan Einav; The Transfiguration by David Jenkins; The Lost City of Z by Matt Thrift; City of Tiny Lights by Kat McLaughlin; Graduation by Trevor Johnston; Harmonium by Anton Bitel; Their Finest by David Jenkins; The Sense of an Ending by David Jenkins; Lady Macbeth by Elena Lazic; Mindhorn by Adam Woodward; Heal the Living by David Jenkins; The Love Witch by Elena Lazic; Clash by Christina Newland; A Quiet Passion by Sophie Monks Kaufman; The Salesman by Mallory Andrews; I Am Not Your Negro by Manuela Lazic; My Life as a Courgette by David Jenkins; Jawbone by Phil Concanon; Aquarius by Ian Barr.

In conversation

Raw director Julia Ducournau talks horror and growing pains; Park Chan-wook, director of The Handmaiden, explains how to shoot the perfect sex scene; Cynthia Nixon discusses her transformation into poet Emily Dickinson for A Quiet Passion; Gemma Arterton talks about her role as a Blitz-era screenwriter in Their Finest; and Brazilian director Kleber Mendonça Filho expands on the importance of John Carpenter in the making of his new film Aquarius.

And finally…

Home Ents reviews of Belladonna of Sadness, Fright Night, Mildred Pierce, Cul-de-sac, Two Films by Lino Brocka, Ludwig, The Story of Sin, Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore and Two Rode Together. Plus Ex Rent Hell presents… Money Train, by Adam Lee Davies.

Order your copy via our online shop.

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About Little White Lies

Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, LWLies has been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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