Posts by Stephen Puddicombe

How the original Planet of the Apes reflected the counterculture of the 1960s

By Stephen Puddicombe

Franklin J Schaffner’s satire was a response to an era of social upheaval.

Why Funny Games remains just as shocking 20 years on

By Stephen Puddicombe

Michael Haneke’s home invasion horror is a chilling satire of violence in popular entertainment.

Are some films actually better suited to smaller screens?

By Stephen Puddicombe

The terrifying intimacy of The Silence of the Lambs lends it to a different kind of viewing experience.

Thirty years on, Withnail & I feels more relevant than ever

By Stephen Puddicombe

Bruce Robinson’s cult classic will strike a chord with any struggling young artist living in a big city.

The groovy, gruesome legacy of Evil Dead 2

By Stephen Puddicombe

Released 30 years ago, Sam Raimi’s blood-drenched horror-comedy is as grotesque and hilarious as ever.

The infamous, irresistible story of Hollywood’s most bitter feud

By Stephen Puddicombe

Bette Davis and Joan Crawford’s anti-chemistry is palpable in What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? from 1962.

How Howard Hawks’ Scarface inspired Martin Scorsese

By Stephen Puddicombe

This 1930s gangster classic set the blueprint for films like Goodfellas and The Departed.

Why The Shop Around the Corner is a true Christmas miracle

By Stephen Puddicombe

Sick of rewatching It’s a Wonderful Life? Seek out the other holiday-themed James Stewart classic.

Kirk Douglas at 100 – In praise of his knockout turn in Champion

By Stephen Puddicombe

As the acting icon celebrates his centenary, we reflect on one of his greatest performances.

50 years on, Ken Loach’s Cathy Come Home is as powerful as ever

By Stephen Puddicombe

This 1966 TV play on a young woman’s descent into homelessness has lost none of its impact.

Why Braindead remains the pinnacle of grisly practical effects

By Stephen Puddicombe

In 1992 a young Peter Jackson created one of horror cinema’s most gruesome and enduring splatterfests.

In praise of Persona – Ingmar Bergman’s minimalist masterpiece

By Stephen Puddicombe

Fifty years on, this low-key drama stands as a glorious shrine to analogue film.

Why Westworld remains the ultimate genre mash-up

By Stephen Puddicombe

The Yul Brynner-starring original from 1973 expertly fuses futuristic science fiction and classic western tropes.

The seductive, subversive sound of David Lynch’s Blue Velvet

By Stephen Puddicombe

Exploring the director’s use and manipulation of music in his 30-year-old masterpiece.

Beyond Pedro – seven great Spanish films you need to see

By Stephen Puddicombe

Before you see Almodóvar’s latest seek out these lesser seen Spanish gems.

Is this the greatest sporting drama ever told?

By Stephen Puddicombe

The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner underlines the importance of competing on your own terms.

The film noir that exposed the everyday horrors of domestic violence

By Stephen Puddicombe

George Cukor’s 1944 Gaslight was the first major Hollywood picture to depict an abusive relationship.

Is La La Land an homage to The Umbrellas of Cherbourg?

By Stephen Puddicombe

Director Damien Chazelle has admitted this ’60s classic is a key influence on his forthcoming musical.

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and the sound of violence

By Stephen Puddicombe

It may not be the most iconic piece of film music, but Tobe Hooper’s organic, visceral soundtrack is uniquely unsettling.

How Archibald Leach became Cary Grant

By Stephen Puddicombe

From finding his feat as touring acrobat to earning Hollywood leading man status, the story of this enduring icon is full of intrigue.

In praise of Sterling Hayden – cinema’s nicest tough guy

By Stephen Puddicombe

With Johnny Guitar returning to cinemas, we tip our hat to one of the most towering acting talents of his generation.

How Federico Fellini mastered the magic hour

By Stephen Puddicombe

Dawn plays an important role in the Italian director’s 1960 film La Dolce Vita.

Taxi Driver and the frightening truth about our current political climate

By Stephen Puddicombe

Is the alt-right giving rise to a new generation of Travis Bickles?

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Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, LWLies has been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

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